What is White Collar Crime?

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What is White Collar Crime?

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If you’ve ever seen the show White Collar, you’ve probably got a good idea of what white-collar crime entails. The term alone elicits the image of men in suits committing financial crimes through their businesses and corporations. As an Arizona criminal defense attorney, Todd Coolidge has experience in handling cases involving everything from DUIs to financial crimes. And we can tell you one thing about white collar crimes: most people don’t think they’ll get caught, because it’s commonly a nonviolent crime committed by individuals with privilege. 

What is White Collar Crime? 

According to the FBI, “The term “white-collar crime” was reportedly coined in 1939 and has since become synonymous with the full range of frauds committed by business and government professionals. White-collar crime is generally non-violent in nature and includes public corruption, health care fraud, mortgage fraud, securities fraud, and money laundering, to name a few. 

Other white collar crimes include:

  • Asset forfeiture recovery
  • Cybercrimes 
  • Conspiracy
  • Identity theft
  • Mail fraud
  • Mortgage fraud
  • Real estate fraud
  • Telemarketing fraud
  • Wire fraud

Committing a White Collar Crime in Arizona

Since white collar crime can be as simple as fraudulently cashing a check or as severe as embezzling millions of dollars from a corporation, the penalties under Arizona law reflect the severity of the crime. When it comes to these types of crimes, the severity of the punishment often reflects the amount of money that was stolen. 

For example, if a person embezzles $1,000 from a company, they are guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor, which could include jail time, probation, and fines up to $2,500. However, if they are caught embezzling more than $25,000, that charge shoots up to a class 2 felony, second only to a murder charge. 

Arizona Criminal Defense Attorney

If you are facing criminal charges for a white collar crime, the intent to commit fraudulent activity is an important aspect of your case. If this intent is proven in a court of law in Arizona, the penalties are strict. However, when you hire a criminal defense attorney with a proven record, you increase your chances of reducing the charge. Call Certified Criminal Law Specialist Todd Coolidge today, for your free case review: 480-264-5111

 

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay (6/28/2019)