Robbery Charges in Arizona - close up of a gun pointed at the camera

2016-09-20

Robbery Charges in Arizona: What to Expect

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As evidenced by the penalties, robbery in Arizona is no laughing matter. Robbery is far more serious than mere theft and is considered a violent crime–and as such you will not be treated well by the authorities. When you are wrongfully accused of robbery or have made a mistake and simply want to move forward with your life, the strongest ally you can have is an experienced attorney like certified criminal law specialist, Todd Coolidge. When facing something as serious as extensive prison time, the last thing you want to do is go at it alone.

In Arizona, there are three classifications of robbery. Those are robbery, armed robbery and aggravated robbery. The severity of the penalties depends on the classification and the evidence the prosecutor has gathered.

Armed Robbery

The most severe of the three, armed robbery is considered a Class 2 felony. A conviction carries from four to ten years in prison and a presumptive sentence of five years. Armed robbery is defined by the use of a real or simulated deadly weapon to commit robbery.

Aggravated Robbery

Slightly less serious than armed robbery, aggravated robbery is a Class 3 felony. A conviction comes with two to seven years in prison. An example of aggravated robbery might be if the perpetrator had one or multiple accomplices.

Robbery

Basic robbery as defined by law “occurs when in the course of taking the property of another from the alleged victim’s body (or immediate presence) and against their will, the defendant threatens or uses force against any person with the intent to coerce the victim to surrender the property or to prevent the victim from resisting.” Robbery is a Class 4 felony and carries with it anywhere from eighteen months to 3 years in prison.

Are you being charged or accused of robbery, aggravated robbery or armed robbery in Arizona? Contact experienced criminal defense attorney Todd Coolidge of Coolidge Law Firm today.

 

*The information in this blog is for general information purposes only. This blog post should not be taken to constitute a formal recommendation or professional advice. We exclude all representations, warranties, legal liability or responsibility relating to its content.

Images used under creative commons license – commercial use (9/16/2016) Geoffrey Fairchild (Flickr)

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