Criminal Damage in Arizona - graffiti on walls

2016-12-15

Help! I’ve been charged with Criminal Damage in Arizona

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While some acts of property damage might seem like mere juvenile shenanigans, the law certainly doesn’t see it that way. Some crimes that involve tampering, defacing, graffitiing and/or damaging property can have consequences as severe as crimes against people. Even if it’s a minor amount of damage, there will still be consequences when convicted of a misdemeanor criminal offense, including a permanent criminal record.

Another element to consider is whether the criminal damage was directed towards someone you are or were in a relationship with. In these cases the act may be considered a form of domestic violence and will likely be prosecuted very aggressively. In these cases especially, you will want to consult an experienced certified criminal law specialist like Todd Coolidge.

The following are some examples of crimes that may be considered criminal damage in Arizona:

  • Altering or tampering with someone else’s property that hinders its value or function.
  • Graffitiing on any private or public building without the consent of the owner.
  • Damaging or defacing someone else’s property.
  • Interfering or tampering with the property of a utility (electric, sewer, water)

On the low end (if the value of the damaged property is under $250) you can still face up to 4 months in jail. On the high end (if the value of the damaged property is $10,000+) you’re looking at up to 2.5 years in prison.

On top of that, if you are facing aggravated criminal damage charges, the consequences could be even more severe. Aggravated criminal damage is when the damage is to more sacred property. For example: Churches, cemeteries, mortuaries, schools, or even construction sites if the damage is caused by the theft of metals.

Are you being charged with criminal damage in Arizona? Don’t wait. Contact Todd Coolidge today.

*The information in this blog is for general information purposes only. This blog post should not be taken to constitute a formal recommendation or professional advice. We exclude all representations, warranties, legal liability or responsibility relating to its content.

Images used under creative commons license – commercial use (12/15/2016) Eric Huybrechts  (Flickr)

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