Disorderly Conduct in Arizona - police restraining a person

What is Disorderly Conduct in Arizona?

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

One of the most common criminal offenses, disorderly conduct in Arizona is a very challengeable charge due to it’s subjective nature. Todd Coolidge, certified criminal law specialist, can often help get these criminal charges dismissed or reduced.

“Disturbing the Peace” is another term for disorderly conduct, which is essentially a catch-all for any disruptive behavior. Many times when you are arrested for disorderly conduct in Phoenix, Chandler or elsewhere in Arizona, it is because you are simply annoying the police officer. For that reason, it is often possible to argue that the alleged disruptive behavior has been overstated or exaggerated.

Some examples of situations where you might be arrested for disorderly conduct in Arizona are disrupting your neighbors with a loud house party, arguing loudly in a public place or even allowing your dog to bark incessantly.

The letter of the law states that the following situations may lead to disturbing the peace or disorderly conduct charges:

  • Making “unreasonable” noise
  • Using offensive or abusive language to attempt to provoke someone
  • Displaying or recklessly handling a firearm
  • Refusing to vacate an area as directed by officials
  • Disrupting or making a commotion at a place of business
  • Fighting or engaging in any seriously disruptive behavior

 

Any of these actions must be done with intent to disturb the peace of a family, neighborhood or persons.

Have you been unfairly charged with disorderly conduct in Arizona? Contact Coolidge Law Firm today for an experienced criminal defense attorney.

*The information in this blog is for general information purposes only. This blog post should not be taken to constitute a formal recommendation or professional advice. We exclude all representations, warranties, legal liability or responsibility relating to its content.

Images used under creative commons license – commercial use (9/16/2016) Linzi (Flickr)

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail